In The Wake of Richard Prince and Instagram, Revisiting Copyright Law, Appropriation and History | #ASX

In The Wake of Richard Prince and Instagram, Revisiting Copyright Law, Appropriation and History

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ASX

In the three decades since artists Sherrie Levine and Richard Prince first exhibited their provocatively infringing appropriated photographs, inexpensive reproduction technologies and distribution systems have further thrown established conventions of authorial control into disarray, and at a seemingly exponential rate. Reactionary focus, then, to both the legal regulation of image production and the prosecution of violators has been rigorous. “Intellectual property” now figures significantly as a cross-over category between legal and cultural discourse. Within the domain of art, appropriation since the Pictures generation might have been determined by artists to be a very risky endeavor. But while there has been the occasional lawsuit, there is nonetheless no doubt that the practice of appropriation in contemporary art is alive and well. There is a lot of copying going on, with, as scholar Martha Buskirk describes, “The types of copies that appear in contemporary art…as varied as the materials artists have employed.”

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In The Wake of Richard Prince and Instagram, Revisiting Copyright Law, Appropriation and History | #ASX
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